Monday, May 29, 2017

Perception, Communication And The Link Between Autism And Animals

 This article was contributed by guest author:  Dr. Lynette Gebler of www.FocusFormulations.com
I’m suspicious of people who don’t like dogs, but I trust a dog when it doesn’t like a person.”
Are dogs more sensitive to human nature or do they simply perceive the world in a different manner such as those with autism?  In the book Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior, by Temple Grandin, Grandin examines the surprising similarities between an animal’s mind and an autistic mind.  Autism is a neurological disorder with various theories on causation. Scientists who study autism believe that the disorder is caused by under development of certain brain circuits, and over development of other brain circuits. The imbalance of the nervous system results in the common symptoms you see in autism such as speech delays, sound and texture sensitivities and developmental delays.  Grandin observes that people with autism, 'are closer to animals than normal people are.' Grandin contributes the differences between typical human mentality and animal mentality, not as a matter of IQ but as a matter of perception and emotion.
 Grandin, autistic herself, states that she has no language based thoughts; all of her thoughts are in pictures. Since animals do not have verbal language and many children with autism are non-verbal, memories and thoughts are stored as pictures, sounds, or other sensory impressions. Sensory-based information by its very nature is more detailed than word-based memories; therefore animals may understand intentions, emotions, images, or thoughts behind the words, even if the words themselves aren't totally understood. You may also observe an animal “sensing” something  before a human and thus dogs can even be trained to alert others to seizures and illness. Primarily, animals and people with autism are visual thinkers; while most people use a combination of verbal and visual skills for communication.  
We would all love to communicate better with our pets and that communication strengthens our bond with them.  Grandin, who is an expert in animal behavior, claims that her autism helps her understand and empathize with animals.  Grandin is also a professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University, an advocate in the autism community and an activist for the humane treatment of animals.
 Find out more about theories on autism and treatments at:  www.focusformulations.com
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